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Business groups ask White House to delay Biden Covid vaccine mandate until after the holidays

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Business groups ask White House to delay Biden Covid vaccine mandate until after the holidays
  • White House officials at the OMB are meeting with industry lobbyists as it conducts the final review of President Joe Biden’s Covid vaccine mandate.
  • Business groups are asking the administration to wait until after the holiday shopping season to implement the rule.
  • They say the mandate could exacerbate labor shortages and supply chain problems.

Worried that President Joe Biden’s Covid vaccine mandate for private companies could cause a mass exodus of employees, business groups are pleading with the White House to delay the rule until after the holiday season.

White House officials at the Office of Management and Budget held dozens of meetings with labor unions, industry lobbyists and private individuals last week as the administration conducts its final review of the mandate, which will require businesses with 100 or more employees to ensure they are vaccinated against Covid or tested weekly for the virus. It is estimated to cover roughly two-thirds of the private sector workforce.

OMB officials have several meetings lined up Monday and Tuesday with groups representing dentists, trucking companies, staffing companies and realtors, among others.

The American Trucking Associations, which will meet with the OMB on Tuesday, warned the administration last week that many drivers will likely quit rather than get vaccinated, further disrupting the national supply chain at time when the industry is already short 80,000 drivers.

The trucking association estimates companies covered by the mandate could lose 37% of drivers through retirements, resignations and workers switching to smaller companies not covered by the requirements.

“Now placing vaccination mandates on employers, which in turn force employees to be vaccinated, will create a workforce crisis for our industry and the communities, families and businesses we serve,” Chris Spear, the association’s president and CEO, wrote in a letter to the OMB last Thursday.

Retailers are also particularly concerned the mandate could trigger a spike in resignations that would exacerbate staffing problems at businesses already short on people, said Evan Armstrong, a lobbyist at the Retail Industry Leaders Association.

“It has been a hectic holiday season already, as you know, with supply chain struggles,” Armstrong told CNBC after a meeting with White House officials last Monday. “This is a difficult policy to implement. It would be even more difficult during the holiday season.”

Thirty percent of unvaccinated workers said they would leave their jobs rather than comply with a vaccine or testing mandate, according to a KFF poll published last month. Goldman Sachs, in an analysis published in September, said the mandate could hurt the already tight labor market. However, it said survey responses are often exaggerated and not as many people will actually quit.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration delivered its final rule to the OMB on Oct. 12, and the mandate is expected to take effect soon after the agency completes its review.

The National Retail Federation, the trucking association and the retail leaders group are asking White House officials to give businesses 90 days to comply with the mandate, delaying implementation until late January at the earliest.

The Business Roundtable told CNBC it supports the White House’s vaccination efforts, but the administration “should allow the time necessary for employers to comply, and that includes taking into account employee retention issues, supply chain challenges and the upcoming holiday season.”

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which met with the OMB on Oct. 15, also asked the administration to delay implementing the rule until after the holiday season. Officials at the OMB declined to comment on the implementation period.

However, former officials at OSHA, which will enforce the mandate, told CNBC that businesses will likely have some time to implement the rules.

Jordan Barab, deputy assistant secretary of OSHA during the Obama administration, said the administration will probably give businesses about 10 weeks, as they did for federal contractors, until employees have to be fully vaccinated.

Read more on CNBC

Health

STUDY: Aspirin Use Significantly Raises Risk of Heart Failure

Aspirin increases the risk of heart failure by over 25%

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STUDY: Aspirin Use Significantly Raises Risk of Heart Failure

Aspirin is one of the most common pain relievers in the world, but a new study finds it may be contributing to heart failure. Researchers with the European Society of Cardiology find taking aspirin raises the risk of heart failure among people with at least one pre-existing health risk. These include smoking, being obese, having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease.

Aspirin has a complicated medical history. While some studies find regularly taking aspirin can help protect against illnesses like COVID-19 and cancer, others show it actually does more harm than good.

“This is the first study to report that among individuals with a least one risk factor for heart failure, those taking aspirin were more likely to subsequently develop the condition than those not using the medication,” says study author Dr. Blerim Mujaj of the University of Freiburg in a media release. “While the findings require confirmation, they do indicate that the potential link between aspirin and heart failure needs to be clarified.”

Older adults at high risk from aspirin use

In a study of nearly 31,000 people at risk of developing heart failure, the team found that aspirin users saw their chances of a heart failure diagnosis go up by 26 percent. Researchers defined “at risk” as anyone with a pre-existing health condition.

All of the participants were over the age of 40 and free of heart failure at the start of the experiment. The team recorded each person’s use of aspirin, separating them into two groups — users and non-users. Researchers followed up with the participants (who had an average age of 67) over a five-year period and after a person’s first fatal or non-fatal heart failure incident requiring hospitalization.

After accounting for influential factors like gender, weight, age, alcohol use, the use of medications, and various measures of health, the team concluded that aspirin independently contributes to increasing heart failure risk by more than a quarter among people with pre-existing health issues. Overall, 7,698 participants were taking aspirin and 1,330 developed heart failure over the next 5.3 years.

Even healthy people face dangers

To confirm their results, study authors compared the readings among aspirin users and non-users. They also examined the 74 percent of the study group that was free of cardiovascular disease (22,690 people) and found that using aspirin increased their risk of heart failure by 27 percent as well.

“This was the first large study to investigate the relationship between aspirin use and incident heart failure in individuals with and without heart disease and at least one risk factor. Aspirin is commonly used – in our study one in four participants were taking the medication. In this population, aspirin use was associated with incident heart failure, independent of other risk factors,” Dr. Mujaj concludes.

“Large multinational randomized trials in adults at risk for heart failure are needed to verify these results. Until then, our observations suggest that aspirin should be prescribed with caution in those with heart failure or with risk factors for the condition.”

The findings appear in the journal ESC Heart Failure.

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Ivermectin Ends Covid in Japan

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Ivermectin Ends Covid in Japan

Ivermectin was allowed as a treatment in Japan on August 13, 2021 when Dr. Hauro Ozaki, Chairman of the Tokyo Medical Association, spoke on national TV about Ivermectin use in Africa and saying citizens should make their own decision to try it or not.

12 days later on August 25 the spike up in Covid cases reversed and plummeted to almost zero where it has remained.

Ivermectin was never “officially approved” as a Covid treatment.

In Japan, several websites are selling boxes of 50 12mg pills for ~6500 yen. Some of them went out of stock and restricted buying several boxes at a time. You get your Ivermectin in ~10 days.

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Ireland bill proposes Government detain people suspected of having Covid, designate locations as “areas of infection”

Not even a confirmed infection, just suspicion.

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Ireland bill proposes Government detain people suspected of having Covid, designate locations as “areas of infection”

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