Connect with us

Politics

Can President Trump win? Read 9 ways he still can…

Published

on

Can President Trump win? Here’s how!

1) Only the electoral college or the various state legislatures can declare a candidate the winner. To base this decision on network vote totals and projections and to call Biden the “president-elect” is irresponsible.

2) The recounts in Arizona, Georgia, and the other states are likely to go heavily for Trump. Most of the likely errors or invalid votes took place on mailed-in ballots. (Machine votes are harder to tamper with) .Since Biden won upwards of two-thirds of mail-in votes and absentee ballots, it is likely that most of the discarded mail ballots will be subtracted from Biden’s total.

3) The networks currently give Trump 214 electorate votes (270 is the victory level).

4) Alaska, where Trump has led by 2:1 all week and is now more than half counted, which will likely throw its 3 votes to Trump, giving him 217.

5) Trump has likewise led in North Carolina (15 votes) all week, and his margin of 75,000 has not diminished. He will carry North Carolina. Like Alaska. The media will not call it for Trump to promote the illusion of a Biden victory. North Carolina would bring Trump’s vote to 232.

6) The vote count in Arizona shows Trump’s deficit shrinking from 30,000 on Friday to 18,500 on Saturday, with about 100K left to count after Arizona (11 votes) is fully counted. It will go through a recount subject to the pro-Trump bias identified in point 2. Were if he’s to win Arizona, he would have 243 votes.

7) In Georgia (16 votes), Biden leads by only 8,400 votes, a margin that has been dropping. Like Arizona, Trump may still win the count and, if not, would have a very good chance of prevailing in the recount. With Georgia, Trump would have 259 votes.

8) Wisconsin (10 votes) is tallied as having been won by Biden by 21,000 votes, but a recanvass is in the offing. Given the facts enumerated in point 2, there is an excellent chance Trump will carry Wisconsin. The recount process in Wisconsin is uniquely fair and transparent — a model for the nation — so Trump may well flip the state. If he does, he will have 269 votes — one shy of victory.

9) Then, it comes down Pennsylvania and its 20 votes. The Supreme Court provisionally allowed ballots to be counted if they arrived before Friday, Nov. 6, and were postmarked before Election Day, Nov. 3, and ordered late votes to be segregated when Justice Samuel Alito was informed that the state had not segregated the late votes, as Pennsylvania’s Secretary of the Commonwealth had advised, Justice Alito made it an order on Friday. Biden currently leads by 37,000 votes in Pennsylvania. The number of late-arriving ballots likely far exceeds this total (the state has not published this information). Justice Alito and a Court majority may throw out the late ballots, likely delivering the state to Trump.

In addition, for the reasons stated above, a recanvass is likely to give Trump a decisive advantage. If he wins Pennsylvania, he would have 289 votes and a victory. Will there be a recount in Pennsylvania? The current law requires one if the margin is under 0.5 percent, and in Pennsylvania, it likely will be slightly greater.

There are two ways to trigger a recount: First, the Supreme Court could order one after the vote counters so flagrantly violated Alito’s order to segregate the votes that he had to re-issue it and remember, four justices wanted to reconsider whether to allow late ballots entirely, but the court was deadlocked 4-4 in October.

Now with Justice Amy Coney Barrett in the mix, it may take a different view, particularly if the presidency hangs in the balance. Second, Article II Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution reads: “Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress.”

The Pennsylvania Legislature, solidly in Republican hands, may choose to do a recount before appointing electors. To build the case for doing so, it may hold hearings into the allegations of fraud to help the voters of the state understand how flagrantly their votes were counted. Already, the leader of the State Senate in Pennsylvania and the speaker of the State Assembly have held a news conference announcing their intention to “audit” the vote-counting process. As the saying goes: “It’s not over until the fat lady sings.” And she hasn’t.

Politics

Couric Admits She Edited Interview Of RBG, Cutting Justice Saying Anthem Kneelers Show ‘Contempt’ For America

Published

on

Couric Admits She Edited Interview Of RBG, Cutting Justice Saying Anthem Kneelers Show ‘Contempt’ For America
  • Katie Couric has admitted to editing out Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s controversial comments from her 2016 sit-down with the late Supreme Court Justice 
  • Couric writes that she was faced with a ‘conundrum’ while working on the story for Yahoo! News, in her scathing new memoir, Going There, released October 26
  • The former Today show host reveals Ginsburg responded negatively when asked about people who kneel for the national anthem as a protest against racism
  • The published story did include quotes from the justice calling the gesture ‘dumb and disrespectful’ but omitted more controversial remarks
  • Ginsburg had also said that such protests showed ‘contempt for a government that has made it possible for their parents and grandparents to live a decent life’ 
  • ‘…which they probably could not have lived in the places they came from…as they became older they realize that this was youthful folly,’ she added
  • Couric claims that Ginsburg, who was 83 at the time, was ‘elderly and probably didn’t fully understand the question’ 
  • She admits she ‘wanted to protect’ Ginsburg and felt that the issue of racial justice was a ‘blind spot’ for her

Katie Couric has admitted to ‘protecting’ Ruth Bader Ginsburg from public backlash by cutting out negative comments she made about people who kneel during the national anthem. 

The former Today show host reveals in her new book that she let her personal political views influence her editing decisions after her interview with the late Supreme Court justice in 2016. 

In new memoir, Going There, Couric writes that she edited out a part where Ginsburg said that those who kneel during the national anthem are showing ‘contempt for a government that has made it possible for their parents and grandparents to live a decent life.’ 

The published story, which Couric wrote for Yahoo! News in 2016, did include quotes from Ginsburg saying refusing to stand for the anthem was ‘dumb and disrespectful’, but omitted more problematic remarks. 

But Couric writes in her memoir that she thought the justice, who was 83 at the time, was ‘elderly and probably didn’t fully understand the question.’

The anecdote is the latest controversial revelation to emerge from Couric’s book, which is set to be released October 26. 

DailyMail.com previously revealed how the veteran news anchor brutally rips into her former colleagues, ex-boyfriends, and celebrities in the score-settling tome, which runs to 500 pages.

Couric, 64, writes that she always tried to keep her ‘personal politics’ out of her reporting throughout her career. 

Read more on Daily Mail

Continue Reading

Opinion

Biden’s Approval 10 Points Lower Than Obama’s At Same Point In Presidency

Published

on

Biden’s Approval 10 Points Lower Than Obama’s At Same Point In Presidency

President Biden’s job approval currently sits 10 points lower than that of his former boss, President Barack Obama, at the same point in his presidency in 2009.

According to approval ratings averages calculated by RealClearPolitics (RCP), Obama’s approval rating on Oct. 11 during his first year in office sat at 53 percent with a disapproval rating of 40 percent. 

During all of Obama’s eight years as president, Biden worked as his vice president. 

It has been over 12 years since the two started their time in the White House, and Biden is now sitting at an RCP average approval rating of 43 percent with a disapproval rating of 52.3 percent.

The averages calculated by RCP are pulled from a variety of polls including ones done by Fox News, Gallup, Reuters/Ipsos, Rasmussen and Monmouth.

Biden’s approval rating has been steadily dropping since he took office in January as his administration has attempted to manage a variety of blunders from the chaotic troop withdrawal from Afghanistan to the record-smashing surge of illegal immigrants crossing the southern border

Read more on The New York Post

Continue Reading

Opinion

Rasmussen: Growing Number of Voters Say Cheating Tainted the 2020 Election

Biden 2020 win ‘tainted,’ 56% say it was a cheater’s paradise

Published

on

Rasmussen: Growing Number of Voters Say Cheating Tainted the 2020 Election

A growing number of likely voters believe that cheating tainted President Joe Biden’s 2020 win over former President Donald Trump, and even more feel that a key Democratic election reform scheme will increase fraud.

In the latest Rasmussen Reports survey, 56% of respondents said, “It’s likely that cheating affected the outcome of the 2020 presidential election, including 41% who say it’s ‘very likely.’”

That is a significant increase from April, when 51% said “Biden’s election was tainted by cheating.”

The change comes as Trump has continued to raise election integrity charges and as Democrats have tried to force through liberal election reforms and shut down GOP state voting reforms.

In the new survey, voters told Rasmussen that they are not sold on efforts by Biden and congressional Democrats to expand COVID-era voting by mail, believing it will “lead to more cheating in elections.”

The results are a rejection of sorts of key features in House and Senate election reform bills supported by Biden and given to Vice President Kamala Harris to sell nationally.

By a 65%-28% margin, likely voters told the polling outfit that they believe more mail-in voting options will boost cheating. That included a majority, 51%, who said it is “very likely” cheating will expand.

The survey is the latest to suggest that partisans remain divided on the issue, though 95% agree with the vague goal of ending election cheating.

Read more on The Washington Examiner

Continue Reading

Trending