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Economy

Here are all the reps who voted against the bill to increase ‘survival checks’ from $600 to $2,000

And what they had to say as to why…

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Economy

CNN Uses “Before Times” Rhetoric to Justify Empty Shelves

“They are laying narrative groundwork to prepare you for a world of shortages, scarcity, and incompetence.”

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CNN Uses “Before Times” Rhetoric to Justify Empty Shelves

Questions are being asked of CNN after the network used the creepy dystopian phrase “Before Times” to describe a time pre-COVID when grocery shelves weren’t empty.

The phrase appears in a report about how grocery shelves “are not going back to normal this year” as a result of labor shortages and transportation restrictions.

“If you hoped grocery stores this fall and winter would look like they did in the Before Times, with limitless options stretching out before you in the snack, drink, candy and frozen foods aisles, get ready for some disappointing news,” states the article.

Note how “Before Times” is emphasized by its seemingly otherwise unnecessary capitalization.

The dystopian language appears to be another way of socially engineering Americans to accept “the new normal,” which will include rolling lockdowns, energy crises and food shortages.

Twitter users accused the network of weaponizing language to induce fearmongering.

“They say ‘The Before Times’ like COVID is equivalent to Jesus. Absolute lunatics,” tweeted Robby Starbuck.

“Interesting way of saying that we will have food shortages in Joe Biden’s America,” remarked Harrison Krank.

Read more on Summit News

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Economy

Gas prices hit $5 in Manhattan

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Gas prices hit  in Manhattan

Gas prices are on the rise and they have hit nearly $5 for regular and are now about $5.40 a gallon for supreme in Manhattan.

A Mobil station on 11th Ave. on the West Side had the eye-popping prices on Monday evening.

Gas prices have jumped across the nation as oil prices reach a 7-year high.

The average price of gas across the country is about $3.25 per gallon according to GasBuddy and $3.31 according to the Lundberg Survey.

Average prices are up more than $1 from a year ago, according to GasBuddy data compiled from more than 150,000 gas stations across the country.    

Just eight states have average prices under $3 per gallon — Oklahoma, Mississippi, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Kansas, Alabama, and Missouri, according to GasBuddy.

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Business

No college degree? More employers than ever just don’t care

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No college degree? More employers than ever just don’t care

If you don’t have a four-year college degree, you’re hardly alone. The majority of US working age adults do not.

You may assume you have little chance of developing a well-paying career with benefits and growth potential at a Fortune 500 company. After all, so many jobs require a Bachelor’s degree.

But your chances may be better than you think, thanks to a growing network of white-collar apprenticeship programs that lead to jobs at blue chip employers, including big tech players like Google, Amazon and Salesforce.

Such programs result in paid, on-the-job training, benefits, coaching and access to employee and alumni networks.

Facing reality

Over the past five years, employers have been trying to solve for two things:

One is a long-predicted skilled labor shortage — especially in technology. The other is the need to actively address systemic inequities and unconscious bias in their hiring and promotions practices.

To stay competitive, they’ve realized they have to broaden their search for high-potential candidates, since there is now greater recognition that no race, ethnicity, gender, zip code or diploma has a monopoly on talent.

“We’re a talent-based company. It’s our only asset. So we widened the aperture,” said Pallavi Verma, a senior managing director at consulting firm Accenture, which created its first apprenticeship program in Chicago in 2016 and has since brought on 1,200 apprentices across 35 cities. “[The program] is part of our talent strategy.”

Year Up is an organization that provides tuition-free, college-credit-eligible job training in 29 US locations. And like many nonprofits and community colleges around the country, it partners with employers, like Accenture, to find high-potential apprentices.

Read more on CNN

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