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Meet the Republican version of The Squad…

A new, diverse class of Republicans preps for battle with the left — in a bid to win back the House.

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Meet the Republican version of The Squad…

There’s a new Squad on Capitol Hill… Politico Reports…

On the first day of Congress’ freshman orientation, four incoming GOP members realized they shared a special connection: All had first- or second-hand experience living in communist or socialist countries.

The crew quipped that their family histories with brutal dictatorships and their aversion to Big Government basically made them the opposite of the liberal “Squad” that has surged to political stardom in the House.

Taking a page from their social media savvy rivals, they took to Twitter to share the name of their own counterrevolution. And the Republican “Force” was born.

The quartet — which includes Malliotakis and Reps.-elect Carlos Gimenez and Maria Elvira Salazar of Florida, and Victoria Spartz of Indiana — is positioning itself as a conservative counterweight to the Squad.

Stuck in the House minority, the Force is unlikely to have much influence on next year’s legislative agenda. But their message is already proving politically potent.

Democrats are still reeling from House losses in November, when lawmakers on both sides of the aisle say the anti-socialist attacks helped take down a dozen incumbents, including in South Florida.

Beyond the initial four members in the Force, there’s also California GOP Reps.-elect Young Kim and Michelle Steel, Korean immigrants who have been friends for decades and speak on the trail. Steel frequently points to the suffering their families endured under communist regimes.

Rep.-elect Young Kim, who immigrated from South Korea in 1975, will be the nation’s first Korean American woman elected to the House of Representatives.

They all belong to a high-profile freshman class that includes a record-breaking number of women and minorities for the House GOP. And with their diverse backgrounds and already-impressive Twitter followings, the Force could have an outsize impact as Republicans look to take back the House in 2022 — particularly as some are itching to do battle directly with the Squad.

As members of the Force build up their political and social media brands, they’re taking cues from an unlikely, but familiar, source: Squad leader Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Many members of the GOP Force — who, like the Squad, are mostly young and female — have even adopted Ocasio-Cortez’s pull-back-the-curtain style of politics. Ocasio-Cortez is known to post seemingly staged videos as she preps meals while casually discussing legislation coming to the floor.

Mace recently documented her journey through freshman orientation, which included getting lost in the Capitol building and racing across the campus. Salazar, who is credited with coining the Force moniker, posted a picture of the female group members with the caption: “We’re all working moms & we’re a true FORCE to be reckoned with!”

And earlier this summer, Salazar, a former broadcast journalist for Telemundo, got nearly 600,000 views on a Twitter video in which she recorded herself in the Goya aisle of a grocery store blasting Ocasio-Cortez for pushing a boycott on the company for its leadership’s support for Trump.

“I think the entire class is the Freedom Force.”

Rep-elect. Michelle Steel defeated first-term Rep. Harley Rouda in her Southern California district, only the second time in more than two decades that a GOP candidate in the state has defeated an incumbent Democrat. | Chris Carlson/AP Photo

Aside from Ocasio-Cortez and a few other congressional Democrats, the vast majority of the party reject any notion that they back socialism in any form.

The incoming Republicans say they want to put a personal face on their ideological fight. Steel talks about how her parents escaped Korea and relocated to Japan and said she sees how it is easy to take freedom for granted in the U.S. Malliotakis — who defeated Army veteran Max Rose in a hard-fought Staten Island race — said in an interview that she wants to warn the younger generation of the perils of socialism and that she plans to take her message to college campuses.

“We want to make sure, particularly young people, understand that socialism is not something grand,” she said.

Rep.-elect Yvette Herrell is the GOP’s first Native American woman to serve in Congress. | Russell Contreras/AP Photo

Republican leaders across Washington recognize that the future of their party — which has long been dominated by white men — rests with their new class of women and minorities. Elevating their voices will be a critical part of the GOP’s strategy to win back the House in 2022.

Rep.-elect Nancy Mace dons a mask as she addresses supporters outside a Waffle House on Nov. 4, 2020, in Ladson, S.C. Mace defeated Democratic Rep. Joe Cunningham in South Carolina’s 1st District. | Meg Kinnard/AP Photo

The incoming GOP women are a tight-knit crew. They are already discussing their plans to recruit more female candidates ahead of 2022, a midterm election that could propel Republicans back into the majority.

Read the full article on Politico

Local News

Department comes out with a stunning document after a recent power outage- Texas ordered by Department of Energy to turn off power.

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Department comes out with a stunning document after a recent power outage- Texas ordered by Department of Energy to turn off power.

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Business

BITCOIN GOES BOOM ^ ABOVE 50K 1st TIME E V E R.

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BITCOIN GOES BOOM ^ ABOVE 50K 1st TIME E V E R.

KEY POINTS

  • Bitcoin surged to an all-time high of more than $50,000 on Tuesday.
  • Large firms like Tesla, Mastercard and BNY Mellon have shown support for cryptocurrencies.
  • Many crypto investors believe the current bull run is different to a late 2017 bubble.

MORE… CNBC. 😉

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Health

LA Students to be FORCED to take COVID-19 Vaccine if they want to return to school…

Los Angeles students required to get COVID-19 vaccine (once available) before return to school…

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LA Students to be FORCED to take COVID-19 Vaccine if they want to return to school…

Source: LA TIMES

Once COVID-19 vaccines are available to children, Los Angeles students will have to be immunized before they can return to campus, Supt. Austin Beutner said Monday.

Beutner however, did not suggest that campuses remain closed until then. Instead, he said, the state should set standards for reopening all schools, clearly justify the directives, and then require campuses to open when the standards are achieved.

A COVID-19 vaccine requirement would be “no different than students who are vaccinated for measles or mumps,” Beutner said in a pre-recorded briefing. He also compared students, staff and others getting a COVID-19 vaccine to those who “are tested for tuberculosis before they come on campus. That’s the best way we know to keep all on a campus safe.”

But a vaccine will not be in the arms of students for some time. The two vaccines that have received emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration so far were tested almost exclusively in adults. The clinical trial of the shot made by Pfizer and BioNTech included 153 16- and 17-year-olds, and some of the experts who reviewed the data for the FDA said there weren’t enough teens to determine whether the vaccine is safe for that age group, let alone for younger children.

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