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Social Relations Being Destroyed By Snitching Culture

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Social Relations Being Destroyed By Snitching Culture

Earlier this month, a student at one of the country’s most eminent law schools received an email announcing that a fellow classmate had anonymously lodged a complaint against him. The allegation: that he had violated University policy by engaging in prohibited behaviors, such as momentarily lowering his face mask to take a drink of water during a 90-minute lecture.

Ironically for a top tier law school — at which vaccination had already been mandated, and where basic precepts of due process are presumably taught — the student was denied any opportunity to be apprised of his accuser’s identity. Nor was he advised of any adjudicatory process to contest the allegations. So the complaint just hangs there, in a kind of creepy administrative limbo, and there’s apparently nothing he can do about it.

I would love to provide more specifics — including the name of the law school, and the exact obnoxious quotes emailed by the Dean in question — but I cannot. Because the person who gave me these emails is extremely worried, probably for good reason, that going on-record could jeopardize his life in all manner of ways. Including social ostracization, compromising future employment prospects, and perhaps even inviting additional retribution from what I’ve been told is a highly ‘assertive’ crew of official disciplinarians.

It’s far from an unusual situation. As you may be aware, since I began reporting on colleges and universities that continue to enforce outlandishly stringent COVID measures well into this current Fall semester, I’ve received a torrent of messages from students across the country with stories of the latest bizarre administrative dictates they’ve been subjected to. Almost invariably, the students are adamant that their names not be divulged — thanks in large part to a formal and informal snitch culture which now pervades these institutions, including the aforementioned “elite” law school.

And so students are hindered from publicly criticizing policies that to outsiders increasingly appear beyond ridiculous. To review just a sampling: At Stanford and University of Pennsylvania, vaccinated students are required to wear face masks while playing pickup basketball. At Georgetown and the University of Southern California, students are expressly forbidden from removing their masks in class even for a few seconds to “hydrate.” At Columbia and Brown, decrees have been issued barring students from hosting guests or going to restaurants. And just this past Monday, Harvard Business School canceled in-person classes, citing an allegedly “distressing” spate of “cases” amongst a population of students who — as is uniformly true at these institutions — are already near-universally vaccinated. 

To justify such intrusive measures, administrators seem to need only incant the word “Delta,” as though it’s some kind of magical spell — and then all prior assurances that mandatory vaccine uptake would enable a return to “normalcy” disappear in a poof of smoke.

As you might expect, the messages keep pouring in. I’m almost not sure if it’ll do any good to continue reporting them, because at a certain point the whole routine may become repetitive. But, you play with the cards you’ve been dealt I suppose. George Mason University just sent out a directive demanding that masks be worn in cubicles, “even if you are alone within the cubicle and even if there is no one occupying the cubicles and spaces around you.”

Here’s a notice to University of Oregon law students that campus security will be diligently monitoring the outdoor basketball court, to ensure that masks are worn while students are shootin’ hoops.

At UC San Diego, wearing a mask in perpetuity is now deemed necessary as a “psychological” safeguard:

At the University of North Carolina — Chapel Hill this semester, course syllabi contain a clause that threatens swift and decisive disciplinary intervention for even the smallest infractions. “If you choose not to wear a mask,” the clause reads, “or wear it improperly, I will ask you to leave immediately, and I will submit a report to the Office of Student Conduct. At that point you will be disenrolled from this course.”

Summary disenrollment for improper mask-wearing practices? Yep — that’s the threat, anyway. Hassan Melehy, a professor of French at UNC, confirmed to me that his syllabus contains such language. Per usual, these unwieldy threats tend to be made at the supposed behest of some imagined “community,” such as an “educational community,” which seems a convenient public-spirited pretext for the individual paranoias of instructors.

Read full story on Substack (Michael Tracey)

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STUDY: Aspirin Use Significantly Raises Risk of Heart Failure

Aspirin increases the risk of heart failure by over 25%

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STUDY: Aspirin Use Significantly Raises Risk of Heart Failure

Aspirin is one of the most common pain relievers in the world, but a new study finds it may be contributing to heart failure. Researchers with the European Society of Cardiology find taking aspirin raises the risk of heart failure among people with at least one pre-existing health risk. These include smoking, being obese, having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease.

Aspirin has a complicated medical history. While some studies find regularly taking aspirin can help protect against illnesses like COVID-19 and cancer, others show it actually does more harm than good.

“This is the first study to report that among individuals with a least one risk factor for heart failure, those taking aspirin were more likely to subsequently develop the condition than those not using the medication,” says study author Dr. Blerim Mujaj of the University of Freiburg in a media release. “While the findings require confirmation, they do indicate that the potential link between aspirin and heart failure needs to be clarified.”

Older adults at high risk from aspirin use

In a study of nearly 31,000 people at risk of developing heart failure, the team found that aspirin users saw their chances of a heart failure diagnosis go up by 26 percent. Researchers defined “at risk” as anyone with a pre-existing health condition.

All of the participants were over the age of 40 and free of heart failure at the start of the experiment. The team recorded each person’s use of aspirin, separating them into two groups — users and non-users. Researchers followed up with the participants (who had an average age of 67) over a five-year period and after a person’s first fatal or non-fatal heart failure incident requiring hospitalization.

After accounting for influential factors like gender, weight, age, alcohol use, the use of medications, and various measures of health, the team concluded that aspirin independently contributes to increasing heart failure risk by more than a quarter among people with pre-existing health issues. Overall, 7,698 participants were taking aspirin and 1,330 developed heart failure over the next 5.3 years.

Even healthy people face dangers

To confirm their results, study authors compared the readings among aspirin users and non-users. They also examined the 74 percent of the study group that was free of cardiovascular disease (22,690 people) and found that using aspirin increased their risk of heart failure by 27 percent as well.

“This was the first large study to investigate the relationship between aspirin use and incident heart failure in individuals with and without heart disease and at least one risk factor. Aspirin is commonly used – in our study one in four participants were taking the medication. In this population, aspirin use was associated with incident heart failure, independent of other risk factors,” Dr. Mujaj concludes.

“Large multinational randomized trials in adults at risk for heart failure are needed to verify these results. Until then, our observations suggest that aspirin should be prescribed with caution in those with heart failure or with risk factors for the condition.”

The findings appear in the journal ESC Heart Failure.

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Ivermectin Ends Covid in Japan

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Ivermectin Ends Covid in Japan

Ivermectin was allowed as a treatment in Japan on August 13, 2021 when Dr. Hauro Ozaki, Chairman of the Tokyo Medical Association, spoke on national TV about Ivermectin use in Africa and saying citizens should make their own decision to try it or not.

12 days later on August 25 the spike up in Covid cases reversed and plummeted to almost zero where it has remained.

Ivermectin was never “officially approved” as a Covid treatment.

In Japan, several websites are selling boxes of 50 12mg pills for ~6500 yen. Some of them went out of stock and restricted buying several boxes at a time. You get your Ivermectin in ~10 days.

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Ireland bill proposes Government detain people suspected of having Covid, designate locations as “areas of infection”

Not even a confirmed infection, just suspicion.

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Ireland bill proposes Government detain people suspected of having Covid, designate locations as “areas of infection”

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