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Statues of Historical Figures Who OPPOSED Slavery Now Face Removal

Because they “might now be called racist.”

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Statues of Historical Figures Who OPPOSED Slavery Now Face Removal

Statues and busts of historical figures who OPPOSED slavery now face being removed in England and Scotland because such men “might now be called racist” anyway.

Yes, really.

A statue of William Pitt, an abolitionist who once branded slavery a “curse of mankind,” could be removed by Edinburgh council.

Britain’s youngest Prime Minister and a close friend of iconic abolitionist William Wilberforce is accused of having been “involved in sustaining the slavery-based economy and preventing the abolition of the slave trade.”

Why? Because Pitt didn’t manage to completely eliminate slavery during his premiership and favored a gradual approach to abolition.

“This is what happens when Edinburgh Council hands editorial control of the city’s history to a secretive cabal of activists operating beyond public scrutiny,” said Robert Poll, founder of campaign group Save Our Statues.

“They feed mollifying words to the press, while secretly plotting to remove the city’s heritage.”

“We’re no longer talking about slave traders. We’re talking about Pitt, one of our greatest Prime Ministers and national hero who led us against Napoleon.”

“This shows the reach – and the folly – of this monomaniacal brand of revisionism, where we’re only permitted to view history filtered through the single lens of slavery.”

Meanwhile, a revisionist history group of academics is lobbying Imperial College London to remove a bust of slavery abolitionist Thomas Henry Huxley because he “might now be called racist.”

Huxley, a biologist who contributed to forming Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution, is deemed to have “links to the British Empire,” which is seen as outrageously offensive to Black Lives Matter activists.

One of Huxley’s papers also “espouses a racial hierarchy of intelligence,” which the group claims “might now be called ‘racist’ in as much as he used racial divisions and hierarchical categorisation in his attempt to understand their origins in his studies of human evolution.”

It doesn’t matter that Huxley was a vocal proponent for the abolition of slavery, the fact that some words he wrote nearly 200 years ago would be considered offensive in 2021 is enough to obliterate him from history, according to these extremists.

“Thrilled to see that Thomas Henry Huxley has been cancelled,” joked parody account Titiana McGrath.

“As a white man, his campaign to abolish slavery was clearly a cynical ploy to disguise his inherent racism.”

Source: Summit News

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Health

Ivermectin Ends Covid in Japan

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Ivermectin Ends Covid in Japan

Ivermectin was allowed as a treatment in Japan on August 13, 2021 when Dr. Hauro Ozaki, Chairman of the Tokyo Medical Association, spoke on national TV about Ivermectin use in Africa and saying citizens should make their own decision to try it or not.

12 days later on August 25 the spike up in Covid cases reversed and plummeted to almost zero where it has remained.

Ivermectin was never “officially approved” as a Covid treatment.

In Japan, several websites are selling boxes of 50 12mg pills for ~6500 yen. Some of them went out of stock and restricted buying several boxes at a time. You get your Ivermectin in ~10 days.

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Botswanan Covid Task Force finds new variant cases found only in fully vaccinated individuals

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Slovenia: Drivers must present COVID certificate in order to refuel cars

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Slovenia: Drivers must present COVID certificate in order to refuel cars

There were no incidents in Slovenia on the first day of tighter epidemiological restrictions, with some dissatisfaction among unvaccinated citizens, mostly drivers who were unable to refuel their cars without a COVID-19 certificate.

Most petrol suppliers, including the Ljubljana-based Petrol, which operates the largest number of petrol stations in the country, are rigorously applying the new restrictions, adopted on Saturday, activating fuel dispensers only after a driver presents a certificate showing that they have recovered from COVID-19, have been vaccinated, or have tested negative.

Employees at petrol stations said that there were no delays on the first day of the new restrictions being in force, with only one incident having been reported in Brezice.

Drivers in international transport have been exempt from the new restrictions and can still refuel their vehicles without major restrictions but they do have to wear a face mask when paying for the fuel at the petrol station.

The rule on the compulsory COVID-19 certificate for a number of services and economic activities, applying both to providers of those services and their customers, was introduced due to a worsened epidemiological situation.

Janez Janza’s government is not ruling out the introduction of additional restrictions if the vaccination rate does not rise quickly and the number of new infections and hospitalisations continues to grow at the current rate.

Close to 2,800 new infections were reported in the last two days. In the past 24 hours, 1,364 new cases have been reported, with one in five tests being positive.

Six patients have died of COVID-19, and the number of patients receiving hospital treatment has increased to 347, including 75 in intensive care units. The government is expected to discuss new anti-epidemic rules on Thursday.

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