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Denmark Reports Highest Infection Rate Since May Despite 75% of Population Being Fully Vaccinated

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Denmark Reports Highest Infection Rate Since May Despite 75% of Population Being Fully Vaccinated

Denmark has reported its highest COVID-19 case load since May, despite the fact that over 75 per cent of the population is fully vaccinated.

A total of 1,349 people in the Scandinavian country tested positive over the last 24 hours, the highest number for four months, while 167 Danes were hospitalized, also the highest amount since May.

The country’s virus reproduction (R number) has also jumped to 2.01, which is the highest level since January.

“As such, these figures are not a disaster, but if they continue to rise in the coming days, then it points in the direction that we must do something,” Roskilde University epidemiologist Viggo Andreasen told TV2.

According to Andreasen, a rise was expected due to the Autumn holidays, but the severity of the climb has caused shock because “more vaccinated people had fallen ill” despite booster shots already being rolled out.

Over 75 per cent of Denmark’s 5.8 million inhabitants have been fully vaccinated.

“Although the vaccines are good, there is something here that indicates that they are not quite as good as we would like,” Andreasen acknowledged.

The spike will once again prompt questions as to the efficacy of the vaccine and the sheer amount of ‘booster shots’ that will be needed, in comparison to the far greater protection offered by natural immunity.

As the Times of Israel summarized, studies showed that natural immunity provided Israelis “longer-lasting Delta defense than vaccines.”

“The variant was 27 times more likely to break through Pfizer protection from January-February and cause symptoms than it was to penetrate natural immunity from the same period,” reported the newspaper.

Source: Summit News

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STUDY: Aspirin Use Significantly Raises Risk of Heart Failure

Aspirin increases the risk of heart failure by over 25%

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STUDY: Aspirin Use Significantly Raises Risk of Heart Failure

Aspirin is one of the most common pain relievers in the world, but a new study finds it may be contributing to heart failure. Researchers with the European Society of Cardiology find taking aspirin raises the risk of heart failure among people with at least one pre-existing health risk. These include smoking, being obese, having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease.

Aspirin has a complicated medical history. While some studies find regularly taking aspirin can help protect against illnesses like COVID-19 and cancer, others show it actually does more harm than good.

“This is the first study to report that among individuals with a least one risk factor for heart failure, those taking aspirin were more likely to subsequently develop the condition than those not using the medication,” says study author Dr. Blerim Mujaj of the University of Freiburg in a media release. “While the findings require confirmation, they do indicate that the potential link between aspirin and heart failure needs to be clarified.”

Older adults at high risk from aspirin use

In a study of nearly 31,000 people at risk of developing heart failure, the team found that aspirin users saw their chances of a heart failure diagnosis go up by 26 percent. Researchers defined “at risk” as anyone with a pre-existing health condition.

All of the participants were over the age of 40 and free of heart failure at the start of the experiment. The team recorded each person’s use of aspirin, separating them into two groups — users and non-users. Researchers followed up with the participants (who had an average age of 67) over a five-year period and after a person’s first fatal or non-fatal heart failure incident requiring hospitalization.

After accounting for influential factors like gender, weight, age, alcohol use, the use of medications, and various measures of health, the team concluded that aspirin independently contributes to increasing heart failure risk by more than a quarter among people with pre-existing health issues. Overall, 7,698 participants were taking aspirin and 1,330 developed heart failure over the next 5.3 years.

Even healthy people face dangers

To confirm their results, study authors compared the readings among aspirin users and non-users. They also examined the 74 percent of the study group that was free of cardiovascular disease (22,690 people) and found that using aspirin increased their risk of heart failure by 27 percent as well.

“This was the first large study to investigate the relationship between aspirin use and incident heart failure in individuals with and without heart disease and at least one risk factor. Aspirin is commonly used – in our study one in four participants were taking the medication. In this population, aspirin use was associated with incident heart failure, independent of other risk factors,” Dr. Mujaj concludes.

“Large multinational randomized trials in adults at risk for heart failure are needed to verify these results. Until then, our observations suggest that aspirin should be prescribed with caution in those with heart failure or with risk factors for the condition.”

The findings appear in the journal ESC Heart Failure.

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Ivermectin Ends Covid in Japan

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Ivermectin Ends Covid in Japan

Ivermectin was allowed as a treatment in Japan on August 13, 2021 when Dr. Hauro Ozaki, Chairman of the Tokyo Medical Association, spoke on national TV about Ivermectin use in Africa and saying citizens should make their own decision to try it or not.

12 days later on August 25 the spike up in Covid cases reversed and plummeted to almost zero where it has remained.

Ivermectin was never “officially approved” as a Covid treatment.

In Japan, several websites are selling boxes of 50 12mg pills for ~6500 yen. Some of them went out of stock and restricted buying several boxes at a time. You get your Ivermectin in ~10 days.

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Ireland bill proposes Government detain people suspected of having Covid, designate locations as “areas of infection”

Not even a confirmed infection, just suspicion.

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Ireland bill proposes Government detain people suspected of having Covid, designate locations as “areas of infection”

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