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Gavin Newsom Wins In Blowout

87% IN SAN FRAN; 71% IN LA; 59% IN SAN DIEGO

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Gavin Newsom Wins In Blowout

Yahoo News: California Gov. Gavin Newsom survived a historic recall election Tuesday, winning a major vote of confidence during a COVID-19 pandemic that has shattered families and livelihoods and tested his ability to lead the state through the largest worldwide health crisis in modern times.

The recall offered Republicans their best chance in more than a decade to take the helm of the largest state in the union. But the effort was undercut when Newsom and the nation’s leading Democrats, aided by visits to California by President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris, portrayed the campaign to oust the governor as a “life and death” battle against “Trumpism” and far-right anti-vaccine activists.

Conservative talk show host Larry Elder led the 46 candidates on the second question on the ballot hoping to become governor, but that became meaningless after a majority of California voters chose to keep Newsom in office.


JENNER: ‘You get the government you deserve’

Caitlyn Jenner expressed shock on Tuesday night when voters turned out in force to vote “no” on the recall effort against California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D), telling reporters, “It’s a shame.”

The Republican reality TV star was one of 46 candidates vying to replace Newsom; with 62 percent of the estimated vote in, she received 1.2 percent. 

Jenner slammed Newsom, saying he “didn’t campaign on not one of his successes, because he doesn’t have any,” and then chided those who voted against the recall. “I can’t believe that this many people actually voted to keep him in office,” Jenner said. “It’s a shame, honestly, it’s a shame. You kind of get the government you deserve.”


Exit polls show SUPPORT for Covid restrictions

California Gov. Gavin Newsom staved off an attempt to remove him from office Tuesday, prevailing in the state’s unusual recall election, NBC News projects.

Newsom, a Democrat, faced serious headwinds and multiple crises as polls over the summer showed him in real jeopardy. But Newsom, with the help of party leaders including President Joe Biden, succeeded in rousing Democratic voters with a message that warned a Republican replacement would roll back Covid protections and betray the state’s progressive character.

The recall election asked voters whether Newsom should be removed — “yes” or “no” — and gave voters who wanted him ousted the choice of 46 alternatives.

Newsom thanked California voters for keeping him in office.

“We said yes to science. We said yes to vaccines,” Newsom said in brief remarks at a news conference. “We said yes to ending his pandemic. We said yes to people’s right to vote without fear. We said yes to women’s constitutional right to decide.”


Anti-Trump Strategy Offers Republicans Warning

By emphatically turning back the effort to recall him from office, however, Mr. Newsom made clear that California’s cherished role presaging the politics of tomorrow was not as significant as another, larger factor in Tuesday’s results: the tribal politics of today.

The first-term Democratic governor will remain in office because, in a deeply liberal state, he effectively nationalized the recall effort as a Republican plot, making a flame-throwing radio host the Trump-like face of the opposition to polarize the electorate along red and blue lines.

Mr. Newsom found success not because of what makes California different but because of how it’s like everywhere else: He dominated in California’s heavily populated Democratic cities, the key to victory in a state where his party outnumbers Republicans by five million voters.


87% In San Fran; 71% In La; 59% In San Diego

CNN projects that Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom will not be recalled by California voters. The grassroots effort to oust Newsom was launched in 2020 by a group of conservative Californians critical of the Democratic governor’s record on immigration, taxes, the death penalty and the state’s homelessness crisis, among other issues. But their quest to collect enough signature petitions to force a recall election took off late last year amid anger about Newsom’s Covid-19 stay-at-home orders and other restrictions.

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Local News

More than half of Bay Area residents plan to leave permanently

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More than half of Bay Area residents plan to leave permanently

More than half of the residents living in the San Francisco Bay Area say they are considering moving out of the area permanently, according to a poll from Joint Venture Silicon Valley released Monday.

The survey of voters in five Bay Area Counties found that 56 percent of respondents said they were likely to leave the region within “the next few years,” a higher percentage than in any of the think tank’s previous polling.

A separate 44 percent said they were unlikely to leave, with 14 percent of these people saying they want to move but could not.

Russell Hancock, president and CEO of Joint Venture Silicon Valley, told The San Francisco Chronicle that the issue comes down to the costs of housing.

“It’s housing, stupid,” Hancock told the newspaper. “That is driving almost all of the results we see in this poll.”

Among those who were likely to leave, 84 percent cited the cost of living as a major reason, 77 percent specifically cited high housing costs and 62 percent cited the quality of life.

Read more on The Hill

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Local News

Walgreens Closing 5 San Fran Stores, Citing ‘Organized Retail Crime’

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Walgreens Closing 5 San Fran Stores, Citing ‘Organized Retail Crime’

Walgreens will close five more San Francisco stores, a company spokesperson confirmed Tuesday, citing ongoing organized retail crime as the reason. 

The closures are as follows:

  • 2550 Ocean Ave. will close on Nov. 8 and will transfer prescription files to 1630 Ocean Ave.
  • 4645 Mission St. will close on Nov. 11 and will transfer prescription files to 965 Geneva St.
  • 745 Clement St. will close on Nov. 15 and will transfer prescription files to 3601 California St.
  • 300 Gough St. will close on Nov. 15 and will transfer prescriptions to 2145 Market St.
  • 3400 Cesar Chavez St. will close on Nov. 17 and will transfer prescriptions to 2690 Mission St.

“Organized retail crime continues to be a challenge facing retailers across San Francisco, and we are not immune to that,” said Walgreens spokesperson Phil Caruso. “Retail theft across our San Francisco stores has continued to increase in the past few months to five times our chain average. During this time to help combat this issue, we increased our investments in security measures in stores across the city to 46 times our chain average in an effort to provide a safe environment.”

The drugstore chain hopes to relocate employees from closing stores to other nearby locations.

San Francisco Board of Supervisor Ahsha Safai of District 11 said he was “devastated” by the loss of the store on Mission Street on Twitter, writing “I am completely devastated by this news – this Walgreens is less than a mile from seven schools and has been a staple for seniors, families and children for decades. This closure will significantly impact this community.”

Safai told SFGATE that though the store on Mission Street had added an off-duty police officer as store security in recent months, it was “too little, too late for this store.” He said he has been in touch with Walgreens and that the shoplifting was having an impact on the company’s bottom line, as well as impacting the safety of its employees and customers. “This is a sad day for San Francisco,” Safai said. “We can’t continue to let these anchor institutions close that so many people rely on.”

Walgreens closed a location at 790 Van Ness Ave. in October 2020 after an increase in crime, according to the San Francisco Chronicle, citing a loss of up to $1,000 in stolen merchandise every day. (SFGATE and The San Francisco Chronicle are both owned by Hearst but operate independently of one another.) The rampant shoplifting was often brazen and carried out in broad daylight — that month ​​Inside Edition was filming a segment about the increase in crime in the drugstore when they caught a man jumping over the front counter to do that very thing. 

California law dictates that theft of less than $950 in goods is penalized as a nonviolent misdemeanor.

Read more on SF Gate

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Health

New York must allow religious exemptions to COVID-19 vaccine mandate, judge rules

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New York must allow religious exemptions to COVID-19 vaccine mandate, judge rules

A federal judge ruled on Tuesday that New York state cannot impose a COVID-19 vaccine mandate on healthcare workers without allowing their employers to consider religious exemption requests.

U.S. District Judge David Hurd in Albany, New York, ruled that the state’s workplace vaccination requirement conflicted with healthcare workers’ federally protected right to seek religious accommodations from their employers.

The ruling provides a test case as vaccine mandate opponents gear up to fight plans by President Joe Biden’s administration to extend COVID-19 inoculation requirements to tens of millions of unvaccinated Americans.

Vaccines have become highly politicized in the United States, where only 66% of Americans are vaccinated, well short of the initial goals of the Biden administration.

Seventeen healthcare workers opposed to the mandate sued, saying the requirement violated their rights under the U.S. Constitution and a federal civil rights law requiring employers to reasonably accommodate employees’ religious beliefs.

Hurd agreed, saying the state’s order “clearly” conflicted with their right to seek religious accommodations.

“The court rightly recognized that yesterday’s ‘front line heroes’ in dealing with COVID cannot suddenly be treated as disease-carrying villains and kicked to the curb by the command of a state health bureaucracy,” said Christopher Ferrara, a lawyer for the workers at the conservative Thomas More Society.

New York Governor Kathy Hochul, a Democrat, vowed in a statement to fight the decision, saying her “responsibility as governor is to protect the people of this state, and requiring health care workers to get vaccinated accomplishes that.”

Read more on Reuters

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